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Poetry Explication

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The “Red Wheelbarrow could be interpreted as a poem that focuses on the wheelbarrow and Its function. It could also be Interpreted as a poem that is portraying a clear Image with the wheelbarrow as Its focus because each word Is slowly drawing a clear picture of what is being described. The first TV. ‘0 lines of this eight line poem set the tone for the rest of the poem, as what would be expected of the opening lines of a poem. Ultimately, the poem is composed of one sentence broken up at a multitude of intervals, making it truthful that “so much depends upon” ACH line of this small poem.

Also, these lines are critical for the structure of the poem because they Introduced the idea that “so much depends upon” the wheelbarrow (Lines 1-2). In the third and fourth line of the poem, the four words that were used quickly introduce the image of the wheelbarrow. The word “red,” which can be thought of as a vivid word, lights up the scene. In addition to the utilization of the word “red”, Williams notably separates the world “wheelbarrow” into the two words “wheel” and “barrow.

I feel Williams does this to cause the effect of breaking the Image down to its most basic parts, as If that were possible considering how small the poem Is. By having the Image broken down to Its full extent, the reader Is enabled to see the object more closely. The continuation of the enhancement of the image continues in the fifth and sixth line. The word “glazed” gives the reader another descriptive word pertaining to art and the “rain” assists in giving the poem a newer and fresher look, which is what Williams is aiming for. And finally, the last two lines of the page are where Williams’ masterpiece Is completed.

His utilization of the color “white” Is used to contrast the earlier use of “red. ” In addition to dissecting the Image of the wheelbarrow, Williams has also turned an ordinary sentence Into a poem. Furthermore, F. J. Bargeman’s “An Apology’ was another imagery-based poem that was a parody of William Carols Williams’ “Red Wheelbarrow. ” A parody is a piece of literary work that imitates the style of another work for comic effect. The parodied version of Williams’ poem is slightly longer in length as well as the difficulty in Interpretation.

The first four lines ask Williams to forgive Bergmann for “backing over and smashing your red wheelbarrow’ (Lines 2-4). So by reading the first four lines, It is clear and obvious to determine that “An Apology” is targeted at “Red Wheelbarrow. ” The next four lines of the poem explain how Bergmann supposedly backed over Williams’ wheelbarrow. Bergmann points out that it was raining and the rear wiper of is new SUB does not work, so his reason for supposedly backing over the wheelbarrow become Justified In his point of view.

The last three lines can be chickens” (Lines 9-11). By stating this, Bergmann puts the icing on the cake and completes his attempt to completely ridicule Williams’ masterpiece. Moreover, Comparing and contrasting these two poems may seem easy in a sense due to the fact that one poem is centered completely on the other poem. In addition to these two poems practically being one in the same, both poems place a heavy emphasis on imagery. It is clear that both poems discuss the wheelbarrow and the white chickens.

But there is one important detail that “An Apology’ includes that “Red Wheelbarrow’ does not include, and that is the new plum-colored SUB. It may seem that it is a rather minor and insignificant detail, but taking in the dates of both poems under consideration can show it’s important in the comparison of the poems. “Red Wheelbarrow’ was written in 1923, back in a time when Subs weren’t exactly one of the hottest topics going. An Apology’ was written eighty years later in 2003, a time when sports utility vehicles could be considered as “the norm. Bergmann included the detail pertaining to the SUB to enrich the comedic effect of his attempted parody and to show how irrelevant he feels the poem is to the 21st century readers. Finally, F. J. Bargeman’s “An Apology’ was a poem specifically written to ridicule William Carols Williams’ “Red Wheelbarrow. ” Despite the fact that Bergmann had attempted to attack Williams’ masterpiece, both poems contained a specific kind of imagery that made both poems unique and more complex than once thought.