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Poetry Analysis of Silver and The Moon

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The Envenomed blind men, all possessing accurate but different portrayals of an elephant, show the new dimension one possess from looking at things from different perspectives. Supervising the activities on Earth, the only natural satellite on the Water Planet is perceived differently amongst the Homo sapiens roaming on it. Silver by Walter De la Mare and The Moon by P. B. Shelley are two Insights on the character of the moon. Despite Silver and The Moon both powerfully describing the nature of the moon, the two moms depicts distinct images. Silver’ by Walter De la Mare Is a bravura and meaningful poem with Blvd Imagery. In this Innovated sonnet (with 14 lines, 7 couplets that rhyme and 8 syllables per line except for the last two with 9) that gives the reader a round and calm beat, a mood of serenity is found in the mystical world that appeals to children with tenderly emotion. Throughout the poem, the poet repeats the word ‘silver’ and has included numerous ‘s’ sounds, this allows the reader to feel tranquil as he or she reads the poem.

Alliteration (slowly/silently – silver/shown – beams/beneath – silver/sleeps – silver/stream), assonance (peers/sees) and consonance (slowly/silently) are also delicate additions to the poem. Further emphasizing his point, Walter included symbols Like dove for peace and silver for luster to give the poem positive connotation. In addition, the silver reflection that is castes on Earth from the moon is a symbol of perfection. In the first couplet, the author lays out a peaceful scene. The repeated ‘s’ sounds and the commas in between slows the reader’s mind to the tempo of the poem.

Personification Is used alongside poetic devices to keep the rhyming scheme. Walking the night In silver slippers gives the poem an elegant and graceful touch. In the second couplet, the moon starts to cast it silver touch on the trees. Personification, in peers and sees, is carefully chosen so that the reader can relate to the scene. Silver fruit upon silver trees Is also a powerful message as It describes the perfection In the scene. In the third to sixth couplet, the poet Increases the detail of the poem (from casements to the eyes of a mouse), turning more and ore things to silver.

Walter continues to use personifications, in catch and peep, to enliven the poem. A simile, couched in his kennel like a log, Is used to tell the reader that the dog Is sleeping peacefully In perfect harmony. Furthermore, metaphors, including paws of silver and silver-feathered sleep, are used. Silver and feather both hint a ‘pure/simple’ and uninterrupted sleep. In the last couplet, the poet leaves the reader satisfied. Leaving every detail silver and completing the duty with two adaptors: movables fish in the water gleam and silver reeds In a silver stream.

In short, ‘Silver’ is a magnificent and meaningful poem. ‘The Moon’ by P. B. Shelley is a well-written poem that takes a different stance on the moon from ‘Silver’. Similarly, both poems describe the nature of the moon and uses alliterations, similes, personifications and metaphors to reinforce the poet’s view. Both poems also have all but the last two lines with the same number of syllables 1 OFF poem and allows the story to be spun more clearly in the reader’s mind. However, P. B. Shelley views the moon in a lifeless, tiring, cheerless, dying and dull way.

The poet chose to compare the moon to an old lady; a white moon instead of a silver moon. In ‘Silver’ words with positive connotation help maintain a positive image. On the other hand, words with negative connotation fill the poem. Totters, dying, lean, pale, gauzy, insane, feeble, fading and murky are words that keep the image in the reader’s mind negative. Mr.. Shelley uses half rhymes in an ABA scheme throughout the first four lines. In ‘Silver’ countless poetic devices are used to enhance Walter De la Mare’s poem.

In contrast, only one other poetic device, alliteration (lady lean), is used because poetic device often makes the poem more flowery and positive. Since this is not desirable, P. B. Shelley left out many poetic devices. Despite both poets using figurative language to reinforce the poet’s view, P. B. Shelley, unlike Walter De la Mare, chose to use it in a negative way. The whole excerpt is a simile/personification. And, like a dying lady lean and pale, the simile/personification connects the moon to dying lady.

To continue the personification, the poet used numerous personifications. For example, lean, pale, and totters. This emphasizes the image of a dying lady. Throughout the poem, Mr.. Shelley has included numerous metaphors which make the poem extremely negative. These include out of her chamber, led by the insane, feeble wanderings of her feeble brain and murky east. In all, despite both ‘Silver’ and ‘The Moon’ describing the nature of the moon, Walter De la Mare and P. B. Shelley paints images of the moon that are poles apart.

All in all, the moon is perceived differently amongst different people around the world. Silver by Walter De la Mare and The Moon by P. B. Shelley are two views on the character of the moon. In Silver, Walter De la Mare positively believes that the moon is tranquil and mystical. On the other hand, P. B. Shelley believes that the moon is like a dying woman. Staring at the night sky, different eyes lead to different perspectives. Looking at things from different perspectives opens a new dimension. Sources:’Silver’ by Walter De la Amaretto Moon’ by P. B. Shells

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