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Dead Poets Society

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He believes poetry can “drip from their tongues like none’ and uses this phrase as inspiration to encourage his students to strive for excellence and individuality. He also introduces his students to the phrase, ‘Carper Diem’ a Latin expression that translates as ‘Seize the Day. Mr.. Settings teaching method is highly ‘unorthodox’ and conflicts with Welter’s four pillars “Tradition, Honor, Discipline and Excellence”. He is fired from his position at the end of the film, charged with causing Neil Perry to commit suicide.

Cameron is the perfect example of everything Keating is against. During the march in the beginning of the movie, he s holding the banner that says “tradition,” and from then onwards he represents tradition throughout the movie. Cameron is a hard-working and ambitious student who is dedicated totally to both the school’s and his parents’ expectations. Keen to succeed academically and win the favor of his teachers, he is prepared to betray his friends in order to further his own interests. Cameron is ultimately responsible for the dismissal of Mr..

Keating as he collaborated with the schools administrators to selfishly accuse Keating of encouraging Neil to commit suicide, he is complicit with the school’s administrators. Cameron does not express feelings to others and only cares about his work. For example, on the first day of Settings class, Keating tells them they will all die one day, and it is up to them to take advantage of situations and make the most out of life. After class, Cameron asks if they will be tested on that lesson, showing his concern only for his grades and future career, not about what he can do to make the most of his life.

Also, during their study group, Knox comes back from dinner and talks about Chris. Cameron shows no sympathy to Knox by telling him to forget about her and do Trig. Cameron is also a conformist. He is constantly following people, this is show in various scenes, some of these are: When Keating tells the class to rip out the pages of Pritchard introduction, Cameron watches everyone else do so, and only rips out his pages after he is encouraged to do so by Neil. Cameron only comes to the DIPS meeting because everyone else does.

He tells his madman story after Neil tells him to go along with the group. Neil is the next person who was touched by Mr.. Keating. Neil Perry is a confident and popular student who excels well in his studies. He is well-liked by both his peers and teachers ND is a natural leader. Inspired by his passionate English teacher, Mr.. Keating, he reestablishes the ‘Dead Poets Society’. This shows that he is prepared to challenge the school’s authority. Nil’s ambitions to become an actor are smothered by his controlling father who refuses to give Neil any choice about his future.

As a result, Neil commits suicide at the end of the film. Charlie Dalton a. K. A Unhand is the third character that was affected by Mr.. Settings principles. He is rebellious, disobedient and reckless. Charlie Dalton is the most outgoing and daring of Welter’s students. He exists the authority of the school and is eventually expelled for refusing to sign the document accusing Mr.. Keating of Nil’s death. Attention-seeking, he also invites two girls to the Dead Poets Society meetings. Though he admires and respects Mr..

Keating, he takes Seating’s principles too far and takes several foolish risks such as publishing an article in the schools newspaper under the name of an authority figure, to let girls attend Walton. Unhand always looks to see if people are watching him, and he always says “witty’ comments such as when Keating asks why he stands upon the desk, Unhand replies, “To feel taller. Also, when Keating asks why Robert Heroic wrote the lines he did, Unhand replies, “Because he’s in a hurry. This show that Charlie took Settings teachings too far and wrongly understood. In conclusion, we can say that all the students reacted differently to Seating’s teachings. I would’ve gone Settings way and followed the boys who accepted his work. Keating had a great impact in this film, as he is shown encouraging his students to break free from traditionalism and become individuals who can think for themselves and believe that there is more to themselves than they have ever known on the thought of “Carper Diem. ”

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